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New Video: Nibbling Deletes

This video showcases a technique that I pioneered a few years ago in order to clear out large numbers of rows from very large and heavily used tables - without negatively impacting concurrent operations. (I'm sure other people have come up with similar approaches, and there are other, different ways, to tackle this same problem as well (that I don't address in this video).)

Watch

Video Length: 09:37
Video Summary: Have large tables full of millions of rows where you need to delete data on a periodic basis without impacting write operations? Then check out this video which will show you how to tackle the problem using nibbling deletes.



New Video: Restoring SQL Server 2000 Databases

Hooray!!... my 18th video is now up/live. (And considering that each video takes roughly 6-9 hours to create and finalize... that's saying a lot.) At any rate, in this new video you can learn how to use SQL Server Enterprise Manager to test your database backups as part of a disaster recovery and to restore and recover your SQL Server 2000 databases in the case of a disaster.

Watch

Video Length: 13:01
Video Summary: In this how-to video, you'll learn how to test your SQL Server 2000 backups as part of your disaster recovery plan in order to make sure that you can easily recover in the case of an emergency. To accomplish this, you'll learn how to use SQL Server Enterprise Manager in coordination with the MSDB's history tables to easily populate recovery options, and then you'll see how to manually restore databases as well - and learn how to recover should an error or problem happen along the way.



Bug with User-Defined-Table-Types and is_ms_shipped in SQL 2008?

Sure looks like a bug to me.

Create the following:

CREATE TYPE dbo.LocationPreferences AS TABLE (
	Latitude decimal(9,6), 
	Longitude decimal(9,6),
	MinPref int,
	MaxPref int,
	Importance int
)
GO

Then try to pull it back in a query from sys.objects listing everything that isn't shipped by MS (i.e. a list of what you would expect to be nothing but user-created objects):

SELECT name,object_id, type_desc 
FROM sys.objects
WHERE is_ms_shipped = 0

And.... your UDTT doesn't come back in the result set.

But fire off the following:

SELECT name,object_id, type_desc 
FROM sys.objects
WHERE name NOT LIKE 'sys%'

And you get results like this:

 UDTT_is_ms_shipped

 

Which would seem to indicate:
a) That there's a bug/issue with is_ms_shipped when it comes to UDTTs
b) That there's some weirdness going on as well (notice the names of my UDTT objects compared to normal object names).



Video: Restoring Databases with SQL Server Management Studio

I'm very excited to release this latest video - as it helps bring the entire 'backup and recovery' series full-circle by presenting an overview of what typical (and not-so-typical) restore operations look like with SQL Server Management Server.

In this video you'll learn how to both test your database backups as part of your disaster recovery plan, as well as how to restore and recover your SQL Server 2005 and 2008 databases in the case of a disaster.

Watch

Video Length: 12:52
Video Summary: In this how-to video, you'll learn how to test your backups as part of your disaster recovery plan in order to make sure that you can easily recover in the case of an emergency. To accomplish this, you'll learn how to use SQL Server Management Studio in coordination with the MSDB's history tables to easily populate recovery options, and then you'll see how to manually restore databases as well - and learn how to recover should an error or problem happen along the way.



New Release: Troubleshooting SQL 2000 Maintenance Plans

I'm happy to announce another video. In this video, you can learn troubleshooting tricks for addressing problems with your SQL Server 2000 maintenance plans.

Watch

Video Length: 08:01
Video Summary: Learn about built-in logging and reporting options that will help make troubleshooting problems with SQL Server 2000 Maintenance Plans much easier to deal with.



Book Review: Professional SQL Server 2000 Programming

One of the goals I'm striving for with SSV is to not only provide videos and instruction, but to help take what people have learned in each video to the 'next level'. And one of the ways that I do that is via the 'References' page/link that accompanies each video. On this page my goal is to provide links to books and other resources that people can use to help build upon what they've already learned. And, more than just provide specific details about which books can help build upon content presented in each video, I also wanted to be able to provide book reviews for some of the books that I'm recommending. Eventually I'll also open it up such that registered users can provide their own reviews as well.

At any rate, this review represents the first of my 'Official' SSV reviews that I'll be posting to the site (more reviews will come later). But feel free to chime in with your own thoughts about this book (or others that I should review) in the comments.

Professional SQL Server 2000 ProgrammingTITLE: Professional SQL Server 2000 Programming.

SUMMARY: A must-have overview of key SQL Server 2000 concepts and principles - along with handy reference material in a well-written and easy to understand book. A real winner.

RATING: 5 / 5
AUTHOR(S): Robert Vieira

REVIEW: One of my first 'real' SQL Server Books was Robert Vieira's 'Professional SQL Server 7.0 Programming'.

What I loved about it was how thorough it was given how comprehensive it's treatment of SQL was. With it I was able to learn all of the basics of authoring queries, and also gained great insights into properly writing sprocs and tackling more complex operations.

Best of all, the author's presentation and tone were very approachable, and I found that the book struck a great balance between teaching concepts and principles while still managing to be a great reference book. (Pulling that off with a technical book is a rare feat.)

With Professional SQL Server 2000 Programming, the author basically re-heats most of the material from his previous book, but adds in tons of additional content for new SQL Server 2000 features - matching his original quality, tone, and approachability - making this book a powerhouse.

I highly recommend this book for beginner to intermediate audiences who are mostly focused on development (though the book does cover architecture and administration as well).

NOTE:
If you'd like to see this book review on the SSV website, you can see it here: Professional SQL Server 2000 Programming